August 24, 2010

Pissing on the applicant

Filed under: Job Search, Stupid HR Tricks, We all need a laugh

In a private response to HR’s #1 job: Poisoning the well?, a reader sent me this question:

Is there any point in attempting to negotiate with thug companies that agree on a rate, say they’re going to extend an offer, then the offer comes in at 66% of what you thought was a done deal?

Forget about companies that poison their own well. That’s bad enough. This employer is pissing on the applicant.

My response:

If you are really ready to walk away anyway, push the paper back at them and say, “I’m ready to sign for the amount we agreed on. Not a penny less.”

You’ll learn quickly whether they’re really thugs. Then consider the rule my mentor taught me years ago: Never work with jerks.

I deleted a couple of more choice sentences in my reply to this reader, because I believe that no matter how ticked off you get at an employer or a headhunter, don’t ever go off. Bite your tongue. Swallow your bile. Until you get a chance to tell the story to someone else who might consider working for the jerk.

I couldn’t make this stuff up if I tried.

.

8 Comments on “Pissing on the applicant”
By Debra Feldman
August 24, 2010 at 6:37 pm

Hi Nick- Here’s another bait and switch situation: what do you recommend if you have been hired for one job and less than a year into it, you are assigned to a more junior role that has no upward potential- no change in salary but also no learning opportunities. The employer is not sending any message like resign before we fire you, it’s simply a matter of what work is there and needs to get done, priorities and available talent for reassignment. The employee doesn’t have any leverage do they? Do they have to live with it and collect a pay check or move on to a new company- even if they liked what they had been doing before they were reassigned.

By Laurie
August 24, 2010 at 9:01 pm

In real estate they call it a “buyer’s market”. For jobseekers it’s called an “employer’s market”. Because of that, employers can get away with almost anything when it comes to hiring and firing. If an employer wants to fire an employee it’s an easy way out to call it “down-sizing” which means “Yay! We can avoid a lawsuit by blaming it on the economy!!”

I have little doubt that if the thug company were called on the table for the change in salary, they would say they really can’t offer you more because (insert bulls**t here –>________<— Unfortunately, they can say pretty much anything.

Employment law is being violated under the guise of economic challenges – not in all cases, but certainly in a lot – and the jobseekers are the ones who suffer for it.

Okay, off of my soapbox….. maybe.

By Nick Corcodilos
August 24, 2010 at 10:37 pm

I worked in Silicon Valley a long time. Long enough to experience multiple economic cycles. Engineers would get Beemers as signing bonuses, then buy expensive homes. The next year, they’d be living out of their cars, when their companies would callously dismiss entire departments. The following year, the companies would be yelling at us headhunters, demanding that we help them staff back up quickly because projects were waiting… When all along, had they managed their staff levels properly and bitten the bullet, they would not have been begging the engineers they screwed last year to come back to work this year…

Anyone who thinks it’s an employer’s market should mark a little time, because then it will be a job hunter’s market again. Those who “behaved” during one will do well during the other. Everyone else winds up looking like a bad dog.

By Nic
August 25, 2010 at 7:01 am

@Laurie I have to agree where you stated, “For jobseekers it’s called an “employer’s market”. Because of that, employers can get away with almost anything when it comes to hiring and firing.” However, I would say employers wrong “think” they can get away with anything. Don’t lose sight of the fact that there are state and Federal employment laws in effect regarding hiring and firing practices. I think the worst thing they try to get away with is buying people’s time on the cheap via what amounts to nothing less than fraud.

By Nic
August 25, 2010 at 7:04 am

I meant to write, (and Nic this thing needs an edit function) …”I would say employer’s wrongly “think” … Sorry for original mistyping.

By Laurie
August 25, 2010 at 1:42 pm

@Nic No worries. I knew what you meant.

I had this article sent to me this morning. It’s an interesting breakdown of who not to work for and in the spirit of this blog, here is the link.

http://thestaffingadvisor.wordpress.com/2010/08/24/needlessly-offensive-hiring-practices/

By Ask The Headhunter® | Nick Corcodilos – Toilet paper resumes: More feels better?
August 26, 2010 at 6:26 pm

[…] paper resumes: More feels better?Pissing on the applicantReaders’ Forum: HR’s #1 job: Poisoning the well?Readers’ Forum: How should I […]

By Jose
September 1, 2010 at 9:12 am

If you have right credentials and in a highly sought after field its a job seekers market… Son only a junior in college and already has 2 job offers andn one very lucrative research offer from The NSF , both 6 figure when he gets out of school and being paid for the research he is dong 1,000 per month for maybe 10 hours work, He interned for both companies.. Can thy be rescinded/. yes, but still its a nice feeling to be wanted by 2 top global companies.. I fully expect that he will be working in Southeast Asia and thats a good thing, for this country is turning into a wasteland for people straight out of the university system. His background, software engineering for mobile computing devices at the operating system level….We all know that mobile computing is a hot market and will remain so probably for decades to come. If you cant find a job that doesn’t treat you with the dignity you deserve get retrained. Simple as that.. Liberal arts degrees IMO will be worthless

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